Don’t Blink.

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“When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown-up we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability… To be alive is to be vulnerable.” ~ Madeleine L’Engle

Yesterday, I was driving home from an appointment. On the curb, where I turn into my street, a father with his two-year-old sat where the olive trees grow. The sun was high over head at noontime and the light filtered through the leaves, leaving shiny patches on their smooth tanned faces.

Peals of laughter rang out from both father and his son, who was at the moment, having a ball playing with a plastic bottle cap. He held it up and played with as if it was a prized possession. There is magic in toys of this sort that can entertain for hours.

Both father and son were having the time of their lives. Chatting it up and laughing up a storm. So full of energy, that if they had done an impromptu rain dance a cloud would have surely appeared.

I rounded the corner, and slowed to a snail’s pace in case the boy decided to dart from where he was sitting, as young children often do.

I started feeling the wave of a blush fall over me as I realized I had entered and was enjoying their intimate moment when I wasn’t an invited guest to the party. I offered a little wave out of my embarrassment right as I passed them. The little boy waved back to me in the same way that my children used to when they were little. He waved his tiny hand, holding tightly onto the bottle cap. My heart turned into a puddle in my chest.

On autopilot, I parked the car in front of our house and got out to go inside. But, as my car door shut, the duo pulled me back to them like a magnet instead of walking in the door, my feet took me down the block toward where they sat. Continue reading

Amazing, Incredible, and Not to Be Missed!

This must be seen to be believed. This young firecracker of an 11 year-old girl is sure to change the world with her words! Warning:  Get a tissue before you click on link.

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http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/01/inspiring-11-year-old-on-why-madiba-is-her-first-black-president-video/

Understanding my Dyslexia. A Personal Story.

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I never knew why I didn’t know my right from my left or why I had to use an eraser far more often than everyone else around me.  This is a personal story about finding out, accepting  and understanding my learning disability.

“I now embrace what makes me unique, even if it labels me, and am much more easygoing about it.” Laura Kutney

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/01/mindfully-accepting-my-learning-disability/